SMILE

Stochastic Models for the Inference of Life Evolution

SMILE | Stochastic Models for the Inference of Life Evolution | Collège de France

Presentation

SMILE is an interdisciplinary research group gathering mathematicians, bio-informaticians and biologists.
SMILE is affiliated to the Institut de Biologie de l'ENS, in Paris.
SMILE is hosted within the CIRB (Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology) at Collège de France.
SMILE is supported by Collège de France and CNRS.
Visit also our homepage at CIRB.

Directions

SMILE is hosted at Collège de France in the Latin Quarter of Paris. To reach us, go to 11 place Marcelin Berthelot (stations Luxembourg or Saint-Michel on RER B).
Our working spaces are rooms 107, 121 and 122 on first floor of building B1 (ask us for the code). Building B1 is facing you upon exiting the traversing hall behind Champollion's statue.

Contact

You can reach us by email (amaury.lambert - at - college-de-france.fr) ; (guillaume.achaz - at - college-de-france.fr) or (smile - at - listes.upmc.fr).

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Publication

2022

A minimal yet flexible likelihood framework to assess correlated evolution

An evolutionary process is reflected in the sequence of changes of any trait (e.g. mor- phological, molecular) through time . Yet, a better understanding of evolution would be procured by characterizing correlated evolution, or when two or more evolutionary pro- cesses interact. Many previously developed parametric methods often require significant computing time as they rely on the estimation of many parameters. Here we propose a minimal likelihood framework modelling the joint evolution of two traits on a known phylogenetic tree. The type and strength of correlated evolution is characterized by few parameters tuning mutation rates of each trait and interdependencies between these rates. The framework can be applied to study any discrete trait or character ranging from nucleotide substitution to gain or loss of a biological function. More specifically, it can be used to 1) test for independence between two evolutionary processes, 2) iden- tify the type of interaction between them and 3) estimate parameter values of the most likely model of interaction. In its current implementation, the method takes as input a phylogenetic tree together with mapped discrete evolutionary events on it and then maximizes the likelihood for one or several chosen scenarios. The strengths and limits of the method, as well as its relative power when compared to a few other methods, are assessed using both simulations and data from 16S rRNA sequences in a sample of 54 γ-enterobacteria. We show that even with datasets of fewer than 100 species, the method performs well in parameter estimation and in the selection of evolutionary scenario.

Publication

2016

Fidelity of parent-offspring transmission and the evolution of social behavior in structured populations

The theoretical investigation of how spatial structure affects the evolution of social behavior has mostly been done under the assumption that parent-offspring strategy transmission is perfect, ie, for genetically transmitted traits, that mutation is very weak or absent. Here, we investigate the evolution of social behavior in structured populations under arbitrary mutation probabilities. We consider populations of fixed size N, structured such that in the absence of selection, all individuals have the same probability of reproducing or dying (neutral reproductive values are the all same). Two types of individuals, A and B, corresponding to two types of social behavior, are competiting; the fidelity of strategy transmission from parent to offspring is tuned by a parameter μ. Social interactions have a direct effect on individual fecundities. Under the assumption of small phenotypic differences (weak selection), we provide a formula for the expected frequency of type A individuals in the population, and deduce conditions for the long-term success of one strategy against another. We then illustrate this result with three common life-cycles (Wright-Fisher, Moran Birth-Death and Moran Death-Birth), and specific population structures (graph-structured populations). Qualitatively, we find that some life-cycles (Moran Birth-Death, Wright-Fisher) prevent the evolution of altruistic behavior, confirming previous results obtained with perfect strategy transmission. We also show that computing the expected frequency of altruists on a regular graph may require knowing more than just the graph{\textquoteright}s size and degree.

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